Making your own kindle case

the-crafty-cloud:

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Hello everyone! Sooo many new followers, I’m amazed! Here’s the project I’ve been foreshadowing in my previous post - how to make your own kindle case! It’s taken me a week to make it and then about twice as much to get around finishing the tutorial, but finally, here it is. It works for whatever e-book reader you have that has the following measurements (152 x 102 x 8.6 mms).
It’s my first tutorial that requires a sewing machine, and it took me several days to figure it out and put it together and make it. Which is also a reason why the photography is not the best in this tutorial (and sewing terminology is also not something I’m the best at), but if there’s anything that’s not clear to you, do not hesitate to message me and I’ll try my best to explain right away.

Why bother with making this when it’s so much easier to buy one?
Well…
- It’s cheap. (I know there are some pretty cheap ones that you can buy, but I’m fairly sure this one is *still* cheaper.)
- It’s good practice if you’re new to sewing on a sewing machine.
- I designed this in a way so it can be machine washed.
- I also designed this keeping in mind that the elastics could get loose, so it has an interchangeable panel you can change if that happens!

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fyeahmegwhite:

happy bday, Jack! i hope Meg will call you tonight and say quietly “happy birthday, little brother! let’s get the White Stripes back together.”

scalesofperception:

Architecture of Eixample, Barcelona via Amusing Planet

Eixample is a district of the Spanish city of Barcelona, that lies between the old city and the surrounding small towns. The district was built as an extension (hence the name “Eixample”) when Barcelona started to grow during the middle of the 19th century. The 7.5 square km district is characterized by long straight streets, a strict grid pattern crossed by wide avenues, and octagonal city blocks - rectangular blocks with the corners cut off, which are distinctive for Barcelona. This was the visionary, pioneering design by Spanish urban planner Ildefons Cerdà, who considered traffic and transport along with sunlight and ventilation in coming up with his characteristic octagonal blocks.

SoP - Scale of Environments

(via millennialalex)